Living Well

February 11, 2010

Move Toward Your Goals: Use Your Time Wisely

I regularly hear people talk about not having enough time to do everything they want.  While I listen to this patiently, I also know that time usage is a matter of choices.  We know this intuitively, but we don’t apply what we know to our daily lives.  We delude ourselves into thinking that by some magic we can control time, save a few hours of today for tomorrow, or squeeze 25 hours out of a day for all we want out of life.  Nicolas Hayek, co-founder and CEO of Swatch Watch Group says it like this, “You cannot keep time.  You cannot catch it.  You cannot stop it.  You cannot possess it.  It’s always present, but if you try to hold it, it disappears.  So never try to manage it.  It will beat you at every turn.” 

Hundreds of books on time management can be found with a quick internet search.  In a nutshell, they would all say time management concerns giving priority to what is important in your private life, leisure, and work.  While they all have their variation on the theme, they would agree that one of the issues of time management are time bandits; those areas of life that rob us of productivity.  Time bandits can be classified as those items that keep us from reaping the opportunities for personal growth and living well.  Some time bandits are excessive television viewing, procrastination, moving from project-to-project without purpose, or even those many hours spent on the internet for a variety of reasons (surfing, social network without direction, games, etc., etc.)

A lament I often hear is how “I want to do “so and so” (you can fill in the blank) but never have enough time to actually get this done.”  One of the most wonderful experiences of my life that set the stage for my own future came during a breakfast I had in 1994 with Zig Ziglar.  I asked him, “How do you get the time to write so many books?”  His response, “I write one page a day.  In 365 days, I have a book.”  Now that isn’t rocket science.  That is just making a decision about using time every day for something that is purposeful, a part of your mission.  I have used this discipline myself since that conversation.  I have now written three books, nationally published nearly 50 articles, and researched for other books and projects by spending about 7 to 10 hours every week focused on this craft.  That simple use of time gives me between 300 and 500 hours of writing every year.

My advice, don’t get sucked into believing that time is infinite.  My time—your time—is finite; it has an end on this earth.  If no one has told you or if you are living a fantasy or in denial, let me remind you…you are going to die.  Your time WILL come to an end.  And it may be sooner (or later) than you think or want.  So what is your mission? How will this help you make decisions about your use of time? Will you get control of time bandits or let them use up discretionary moments of your life?  You can manage your time by courageously making some decisions. 

Johann Goethe, the 18th century writer, observed, “One always has time enough, if only one applies it well.”  Make some decisions today.  And one of the first is to read “First Things First,” by Stephen Covey.  I use this book with students to help them wed purpose and mission by how they use of their time.  If you take time to read this book, you will be taking the primary step in managing your finite time for the things what will help you live well.

Blessings as you live well in the time you have available.  Grace and Peace.

David Neidert

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